David O. Smith MD, F.A.C.S  |  6545 France Ave. S, #505  |  Edina, MN 55435  |   Call Today: 952.922.0895

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Dr. Smith performs the following facial plastic surgery procedures at his accredited practice in Edina. Please click on one of the following procedures below for more information.

That first wrinkle, fold, or sign of loosening skin can be truly hard to accept. You still feel as youthful and energetic as ever, but your face seems to be saying something else when you look in the mirror. For men and women who are beginning to notice the early signs of aging, a sutured mini-facelift can help to restore a youthful appearance and slow the effects of time.

At Smith Plastic Surgery, we perform a sutured mini-facelift as an alternative to traditional facelift surgery. This facial procedure has become extremely popular with younger patients who want to maintain their youthful appearance and get a head start in combatting the signs of aging.

This surgery uses shorter incisions to address common problems such as wrinkles or subtle areas of sagging skin in the lower face. Sutures are used to hold the skin and tissues in place to provide your face with a strong foundation that helps to slow future signs of aging. This less invasive approach allows for much quicker recovery and minimal scarring, so you can get back to your normal routine and have people wondering how you are able to look so good for your age.

Dr. Smith works closely with each of his patients to tailor their sutured mini-facelift to meet their unique expectations. This personalized approach allows us to achieve extremely natural-looking outcomes, so only you will know you ever had the procedure. The results of your sutured mini-facelift will leave you looking refreshed, rejuvenated, and feeling as youthful as you do on the inside(*).

We get great results with privacy and cost effectiveness. Call 952-922-0895 between 8am and 8pm to schedule a free, next-morning consultation with Dr. Smith, or you may leave your contact information on the form to your right. Enjoy the good life!

Click here to view our Before & After Gallery.

For additional information on sutured mini-facelift surgery, please refer to the following guide provided by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

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A facelift can improve the deep cheek folds, jowls and loose, sagging skin around the neck that come with age.

 

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Incisions usually begin above the hairline at the temples, follow the natural line in front of the ear, curve behind the earlobe into the crease behind the ear, and into or along the lower scalp.

 

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Facial, neck tissue and muscle may be separated; fat may be trimmed or suctioned and underlying muscle may be tightened.

 

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After deep tissues are tightened, the excess skin is pulled up and back, trimmed and sutured into place.

 

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Most of the scars will be hidden within your hair and in the normal creases of your skin.

 

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After surgery, you’ll present a fresher, more youthful face to the world.

If You’re Considering a Facelift…

As people age, the effects of gravity, exposure to the sun, and the stresses of daily life can be seen in their facial wrinkles. Deep creases form between the nose and mouth; the jawline grows slack and jowly; folds and fat deposits appear around the neck.

A facelift (technically known as rhytidectomy) can’t stop this aging process. What it can do is set back the clock, improving the most visible signs of aging by removing excess fat, tightening underlying muscles, and redraping the skin of your face and neck. A facelift can be done alone, or in conjunction with other procedures such as a forehead lift, eyelid surgery, or nose reshaping.

 

The Best Candidates for a Facelift

The best candidate for a facelift is a man or woman whose face and neck have begun to sag, but whose skin still has some elasticity and whose bone structure is strong and well-defined. Most patients are in their forties to sixties, but facelifts can be done successfully on people in their seventies or eighties as well.

A facelift can make you look younger and fresher, and it may enhance your self-confidence in the process. However, it can’t give you a totally different look, nor can it restore the health and vitality of your youth. Before you decide to have surgery, think carefully about your expectations and discuss them with your surgeon.

All Surgery Carries Some Uncertainty and Risk

When a facelift is performed by a qualified plastic surgeon, complications are infrequent and usually minor. Still, individuals vary greatly in their anatomy, their physical reactions, and their healing abilities, so the outcome is never completely predictable.

Complications that can occur include hematoma (a collection of blood under the skin that must be removed by the surgeon), injury to the nerves that control facial muscles (usually temporary), infection, and reactions to the anesthesia. Poor healing of the skin is most likely to affect smokers.

You can reduce your risks by closely following your surgeon’s advice both before and after surgery.

Planning Your Surgery

Facelifts are very individualized procedures. In your initial consultation, the surgeon will evaluate your face (including the skin and underlying bone) and discuss your goals for the surgery.

Your surgeon should check for medical conditions that could cause problems during or after surgery, such as uncontrolled high blood pressure, blood clotting problems, or the tendency to form excessive scars. Be sure to tell your surgeon if you smoke or are taking any drugs or medications–especially aspirin or other drugs that affect clotting.

If you decide to have a facelift, your surgeon will explain the techniques and anesthesia he or she will use, the type of facility where the surgery will be performed, and the risks and costs involved. Don’t hesitate to ask your doctor any questions you may have, especially those regarding your expectations and concerns about the results.

Preparing for Your Surgery

Your surgeon will give you specific instructions on how to prepare for surgery, including guidelines on eating and drinking, smoking, and taking or avoiding certain vitamins and medications. Your surgery will go more smoothly if you follow his or her instructions carefully. If you smoke, it’s especially important to stop at least a week or two before and after surgery as smoking inhibits blood flow to the skin and can interfere with the healing of your incision areas.

If your hair is very short, you might want to let it grow out before surgery, so that it’s long enough to hide the scars while they heal.

Whether your facelift is being done on an outpatient or inpatient basis, you should arrange for someone to drive you home after your surgery and to help you out for a day or two, if needed.

Where Your Surgery Will Be Performed

A facelift may be performed in a surgeon’s office-based facility, an outpatient surgery center, or a hospital. It’s usually done on an outpatient basis, but some surgeons may hospitalize patients for a day when using general anesthesia. Certain conditions, such as diabetes or high blood pressure, should be monitored after surgery and may therefore require a short inpatient stay.

Types of Anesthesia

Most facelifts are performed under local anesthesia, combined with a sedative to make you drowsy. You’ll be awake but relaxed, and your face will be insensitive to pain. (However, you may feel some tugging or occasional discomfort.)

Some surgeons prefer a general anesthesia. In that case, you’ll sleep through the operation.

The Surgery

A facelift usually takes several hours. It will take somewhat longer if you’re having more than one procedure done. For extensive procedures, some surgeons may schedule two separate sessions.

Every surgeon approaches the procedure in his or her own way. Some complete one side of the face at a time, and others move back and forth between the sides. The exact placement of incisions and the sequence of events depend on your facial structure and your surgeon’s technique.

Incisions usually begin above the hairline at the temples, extend in a natural line in front of the ear (or just inside the cartilage at the front of the ear), and continue behind the earlobe to the lower scalp. If the neck needs work, a small incision may also be made under the chin.

In general, the surgeon separates the skin from the fat and muscle below. Fat may be trimmed or suctioned from around the neck and chin to improve the contour. The surgeon then tightens the underlying muscle and membrane, pulls the skin back, and removes the excess. Stitches secure the layers of tissue and close the incisions; metal clips may be used on the scalp.

Following surgery, a small, thin tube may be temporarily placed under the skin behind your ear to drain any blood that might collect there. The surgeon may also wrap your head loosely in bandages to minimize bruising and swelling.

After Your Surgery

There isn’t usually significant discomfort after surgery; if there is, it can be lessened with the pain medication prescribed by your surgeon. (Severe or persistent pain or a sudden swelling of your face should be reported to your surgeon immediately.) Some numbness of the skin is quite normal; it will disappear in a few weeks or months.

Your doctor may tell you to keep your head elevated and as still as possible for a couple of days after surgery in order to keep the swelling down.

If you’ve had a drainage tube inserted, it will be removed one or two days after surgery. Bandages, when used, are usually removed after one to five days. Don’t be surprised at the pale, bruised, and puffy face you see. Just keep in mind that in a few weeks you’ll be looking normal.

Most of your stitches will be removed after about five days. Your scalp may take longer to heal, and the stitches or metal clips in your hairline could be left in a few days longer.

Getting Back to Normal

You should be up and about in a day or two, but plan on taking it easy for the first week after surgery. Be especially gentle with your face and hair since your skin will be both tender and numb and may not respond normally at first.

Your surgeon will give more specific guidelines for gradually resuming your normal activities. They’re likely to include these suggestions: Avoid strenuous activity, including sex and heavy housework, for at least two weeks (walking and mild stretching are fine); avoid alcohol, steam baths, and saunas for several months. Above all, get plenty of rest and allow your body to spend its energy on healing.

At the beginning, your face may look and feel rather strange. Your features may be distorted from the swelling, your facial movements may be slightly stiff and you’ll probably be self-conscious about your scars. Some bruising may persist for two or three weeks, and you may tire easily. It’s not surprising that some patients are disappointed and depressed at first.

By the third week, you’ll look and feel much better. Most patients are back at work about ten days to two weeks after surgery. If you need it, special camouflage makeup can mask most bruising that remains.

Your New Look

The chances are excellent that you’ll be happy with your facelift–especially if you realize that the results may not be immediately apparent. Even after the swelling and bruises are gone, the hair around your temples may be thin and your skin may feel dry and rough for several months. Men may find they have to shave in new places, such as behind the neck and ears, where areas of beard- growing skin have been repositioned.

You’ll have some scars from your facelift, but they’re usually hidden by your hair or in the natural creases of your face and ears. In any case, they’ll fade within time and should be scarcely visible.

Having a facelift doesn’t stop the clock. Your face will continue to age with time, and you may want to repeat the procedure one or more times–perhaps five or ten years down the line. But, in another sense, the effects of even one facelift are lasting. Years later, you’ll continue to look better than if you’d never had a facelift at all.

The nose is one of the most common features of the face about which both men and women seem equally dissatisfied. Whether it’s because it is too big or too small, crooked, bulbous, droopy, or anything in between, when the nose feels out of place, it can negatively impact the way a person feels about his or her overall appearance. Nose surgery (rhinoplasty) can be a life-changing procedure that lifts a person’s self-confidence by having a beautifully well-balanced face.

At Smith Plastic Surgery, we specialize in cosmetic nose surgery to help patients correct the appearance of their nose. We strive to achieve results that look completely natural–as though the final result is the nose you were meant to have been born with all along. To preserve this natural appearance, Dr. Smith performs closed rhinoplasty surgery, keeping all incisions hidden within your nostrils. From there, Dr. Smith can access and reshape the underlying nasal structure to match the outcome discussed during your consultation.

We perform this surgery on Thursdays, and you will be able to return home (under the care of a loved one) that same night. A splint will be placed following your surgery and will be removed the following Wednesday. It will take some time for bruising and swelling to fade, but you will immediately notice the beautiful new shape of your nose. Most patients are able to return to work within one and a half to two weeks.

Nose surgery at Smith Plastic Surgery will cost about $4800 and includes all fees and anesthesia. We are very proud of the rhinoplasty results we are able to achieve for our patients at Smith Plastic Surgery. Expert rhinoplasty is a special skill requiring three dimensional visualization, good eye-hand coordination, and many years of experience. For Dr. Smith, this is one of his most successful surgeries and one of the most rewarding when patients see their final results.

We get great results with privacy and cost effectiveness. Call 952-922-0895 between 8am and 8pm to schedule a free, next-morning consultation with Dr. Smith, or you may leave your contact information on the form to your right. Enjoy the good life!

Click here to view our Before & After Gallery.

For additional information on nose surgery, please refer to the following guide provided by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

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Before surgery, these rhinoplasty patients have large, slightly hanging noses, with a hump and an enlarged tip.

 

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If your nostrils are too wide, the surgeon can remove small wedges of skin from their base, bringing them closer together.

 

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Incisions are made inside the nostrils or at the base of the nose, providing access to the cartilage and bone, which can then be sculpted into shape.

 

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The surgeon removes the hump using a chisel or a rasp, then brings the nasal bones together to form a narrower bridge. Cartilage is trimmed to reshape the tip of the nose.

 

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Trimming the septum improves the angle between the nose and upper lip.

 

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A splint made of tape and an overlay of plastic, metal, or plaster is applied to help the bone and cartilage of the nose maintain their new shape.

 

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After surgery, the patient has a smaller nose, a straighter bridge, a well-defined nasal tip, and an improved angle between the nose and upper lip.

If You’re Considering Rhinoplasty…

Rhinoplasty, or surgery to reshape the nose, is one of the most common of all plastic surgery procedures. Rhinoplasty can reduce or increase the size of your nose, change the shape of the tip or the bridge, narrow the span of the nostrils, or change the angle between your nose and your upper lip. It may also correct a birth defect or injury, or help relieve some breathing problems.

If you’re considering rhinoplasty, this information will give you a basic understanding of the procedure–when it can help, how it’s performed, and what results you can expect. It can’t answer all of your questions, since a lot depends on the individual patient and the surgeon. Please ask your surgeon about anything you don’t understand.

The Best Candidates for Rhinoplasty

Rhinoplasty can enhance your appearance and your self-confidence, but it won’t necessarily change your looks to match your ideal or cause other people to treat you differently. Before you decide to have surgery, think carefully about your expectations and discuss them with your surgeon.

The best candidates for rhinoplasty are people who are looking for improvement, not perfection, in the way they look. If you’re physically healthy, psychologically stable, and realistic in your expectations, you may be a good candidate.

Rhinoplasty can be performed to meet aesthetic goals or for reconstructive purposes, i.e., to correct birth defects or breathing problems.

Age may also be a consideration. Many surgeons prefer not to operate on teenagers until after they’ve completed their growth spurt–around age fourteen or fifteen for girls, a bit later for boys. It’s important to consider teenagers’ social and emotional adjustment, too, and to make sure it’s what they, and not their parents, really want.

All Surgery Carries Some Uncertainty and Risk

When rhinoplasty is performed by a qualified plastic surgeon, complications are infrequent and usually minor. Nevertheless, there is always a possibility of complications, including infection, nosebleed, or a reaction to the anesthesia. You can reduce your risks by closely following your surgeon’s instructions both before and after surgery.

After surgery, small, burst blood vessels may appear as tiny red spots on the skin’s surface; these are usually minor but may be permanent. As for scarring, when rhinoplasty is performed from inside the nose, there is no visible scarring at all. When an open technique is used or when the procedure calls for the narrowing of flared nostrils, the small scars on the base of the nose are usually not visible.

In about one case out of ten, a second procedure may be required, for example, to correct a small deformity. Such cases are unpredictable and happen even to patients of the most skilled surgeons. The corrective surgery is usually minor.

Planning Your Surgery

Good communication between you and your physician is essential. In your initial consultation, the surgeon will ask what you’d like your nose to look like, evaluate the structure of your nose and face, and discuss the possibilities with you. He or she will also explain the factors that can influence the procedure and the results. These factors include the structure of your nasal bones and cartilage, the shape of your face, the thickness of your skin, your age, and your expectations.

Your surgeon will also explain the techniques and anesthesia he or she will use, the type of facility where the surgery will be performed, the risks and costs involved, and any options you may have. Most insurance policies don’t cover purely cosmetic surgery; however, if the procedure is performed for reconstructive purposes, to correct a breathing problem or a marked deformity, the procedure may be covered. Check with your insurer and obtain pre-authorization for your surgery.

Be sure to tell your surgeon if you’ve had any previous nose surgery or an injury to your nose, even if it were many years ago. You should also inform your surgeon about any allergies or breathing difficulties you may have; if you’re taking any medications, vitamins, or recreational drugs, and if you smoke.

Don’t hesitate to ask your doctor any questions you may have, especially those regarding your expectations and concerns about the results.

Preparing for Your Surgery

Your surgeon will give you specific instructions on how to prepare for surgery, including guidelines on eating and drinking, smoking, taking or avoiding certain vitamins and medications, and washing your face. Carefully following these instructions will help your surgery go more smoothly.

While you’re making preparations, be sure to arrange for someone to drive you home after your surgery and to help you out for a few days, if needed.

Where Your Surgery Will Be Performed

Rhinoplasty may be performed in a surgeon’s office-based facility, an outpatient surgery center, or a hospital. It’s usually done on an outpatient basis, for the purpose of convenience and cost containment. Complex procedures may require a short inpatient stay.

Types of Anesthesia

Rhinoplasty can be performed under local or general anesthesia, depending on the extent of the procedure and on what you and your surgeon prefer.

With local anesthesia, you’ll usually be lightly sedated, and your nose and the surrounding area will be numbed; you’ll be awake during the surgery, but relaxed and insensitive to pain. With general anesthesia, you’ll sleep through the operation.

The Surgery

Rhinoplasty usually takes an hour or two, though complicated procedures may take longer. During surgery, the skin of the nose is separated from its supporting framework of bone and cartilage, which is then sculpted to the desired shape. The nature of the sculpting will depend on your specific problem and your surgeon’s preferred technique. Finally, the skin is redraped over the new framework.

Many plastic surgeons perform rhinoplasty from within the nose, making their incision inside the nostrils. Others prefer an open procedure–especially in more complicated cases. An open procedure involves making a small incision across the columella, the vertical strip of tissue separating the nostrils.

When the surgery is complete, a splint will be applied to help your nose maintain its new shape. Nasal packs or soft plastic splints also may be placed in your nostrils to stabilize the septum, the dividing wall between the air passages.

After Your Surgery

During the first twenty-four hours after surgery, your face will feel puffy; your nose may ache, and you may have a dull headache. You can control any discomfort with the pain medication prescribed by your surgeon. Plan on staying in bed with your head elevated (except for going to the bathroom) for the first day.

You’ll notice that the swelling and bruising around your eyes will increase at first, reaching a peak after two or three days. Applying cold compresses will reduce this swelling and make you feel a bit better. In any case, you’ll feel a lot better than you’ll look at this stage. Most of the swelling and bruising should disappear within two weeks or so. (Some subtle swelling–unnoticeable to anyone but you and your surgeon–will remain for several months.)

A little bleeding is common during the first few days following surgery, and you may continue to feel some stuffiness for several weeks. Your surgeon will probably ask you not to blow your nose for a week or so while the tissues heal.

If you have nasal packing, it will be removed after a few days, and you’ll feel much more comfortable. By the end of one week (or occasionally two), all dressings, splints, and stitches should be removed.

Getting Back to Normal

Most rhinoplasty patients are up and about within two days and able to return to school or sedentary work a week or so following surgery. It will be several weeks, however, before you’re entirely up to speed.

Your surgeon will give you more specific guidelines for gradually resuming your normal activities. These suggestions are likely to include: avoid strenuous activity (jogging, swimming, bending, sexual relations-any activity that increases your blood pressure) for two to three weeks; avoid hitting or rubbing your nose or getting it sunburned for eight weeks, and be gentle when washing your face and hair or using cosmetics.

You can wear contact lenses as soon as you feel like it, but glasses are another story. Once the splint is off, they’ll have to be taped to your forehead or propped on your cheeks for another six to seven weeks until your nose is completely healed.

Your surgeon will schedule frequent follow-up visits in the months after surgery to check on the progress of your healing. If you have any unusual symptoms between visits, or any questions about what you can and can’t do, don’t hesitate to call your doctor.

Your New Look

In the days following surgery, when your face is bruised and swollen, it’s easy to forget that you will be looking better. In fact, many patients feel depressed for a while after plastic surgery. This reaction is quite normal and understandable.

Rest assured that this stage will pass. Day by day, your nose will begin to look better and your spirits will improve. Within a week or two, you’ll no longer look as if you’ve just had surgery.

Still, healing is a slow and gradual process. Some subtle swelling may be present for months, especially in the tip. The final results of rhinoplasty may not be apparent for a year or more.

In the meantime, you might experience some unexpected reactions from family and friends. They may say they don’t see a major difference in your nose. Or, they may act resentful, especially if you’ve changed something they view as a family or ethnic trait. If that happens, try to keep in mind why you decided to have this surgery in the first place. If you’ve met your goals, then your surgery is a success.

Stubborn facial fat can be extremely difficult to get rid of. Even with plenty of diet and exercise, some men and women may still struggle with excess fat around the neck or chin. With neck liposuction, you can refine the contours of your face for a healthy, slimmer, and youthful appearance.

Dr. Smith performs this facial liposuction through a tiny incision made under the chin, as well as small incisions behind the ear lobes to access the lateral areas. This can be done as an isolated procedure for younger patients just wanting to reduce stubborn fat, or as part of a neck lift for older patients with poor skin elasticity. During your consultation, Dr. Smith will work with you to determine the best approach for your neck liposuction.

The cost of neck liposuction at Smith Plastic Surgery is about $2600. This price includes all fees and anesthesia.

We get great results with privacy and cost effectiveness. Call 952-922-0895 between 8am and 8pm to schedule a free next morning consultation with Dr. Smith, or leave your contact information on the form to your right. Enjoy the good life!

Click here to view our Before & After Gallery.

For additional information on neck liposuction, please refer to the following guide provided by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

Neck liposuction is performed on patients who have persistent fat deposits below the chin and in the neck area. When fat accumulates around the neck, the youthful shape of the jaw is lost. With liposuction, your plastic surgeon sculpts this area and removes fat, to restore the angular qualities of the chin and jaw.

Today, a number of new techniques are allowing plastic surgeons to provide more precise results and shorter recovery times. Although no type of liposuction is a substitute for dieting and exercise, neck liposuction can remove stubborn areas of neck fat that don’t respond to traditional weight-loss methods.

The Best Candidates for Neck Liposuction

The best candidates for neck liposuction are normal-weight people with firm, elastic skin who have pockets of excess fat in the neck. You should be physically healthy, psychologically stable and realistic in your expectations. Your age is not a major consideration; however, older patients may have diminished skin elasticity and may not achieve the same results as a younger patient with tighter skin.

Liposuction carries greater risk for individuals with medical problems such as diabetes, significant heart or lung disease, poor blood circulation, or those who have recently had surgery near the area to be contoured.

Preparing For Your Surgery

Your surgeon will give you specific instructions on how to prepare for the procedure, including guidelines on eating and drinking, smoking, and taking or avoiding vitamins, iron tablets and certain medications. If you develop a cold or an infection of any kind, especially a skin infection, your surgery may have to be postponed.

Though it is rarely necessary, your doctor may recommend that you have blood drawn ahead of time in case it is needed during surgery. Also, while you are making preparations, be sure to arrange for someone to drive you home after the procedure and, if needed, to help you at home for a day or two.

Where Your Surgery Will Be Performed

Liposuction may be performed in a surgeon’s office-based facility, in an outpatient surgery center, or in a hospital. Smaller-volume liposuction is usually done on an outpatient basis for reasons of cost and convenience. However, if a large volume of fat will be removed, or if the liposuction is being performed in conjunction with other procedures, a stay in a hospital or overnight nursing facility may be required.

Anesthesia for Neck Liposuction

With a small amount of neck fat, liposuction can be performed under local anesthesia, which numbs only the affected areas. However, if you prefer, the local is usually used along with intravenous sedation to keep you more relaxed during the procedure. Regional anesthesia can be a good choice for more extensive procedures. One type of regional anesthesia is the epidural block, the same type of anesthesia commonly used in childbirth.

The Surgery

During neck liposuction, localized deposits of neck fat are removed to recontour the neck area and lower face. Through a tiny incision, a narrow tube or cannula is inserted and used to vacuum the fat layer that lies deep beneath the skin. The cannula is pushed then pulled through the fat layer, breaking up the fat cells and suctioning them out. The suction action is provided by a vacuum pump or a large syringe, depending on the surgeon’s preference

All Surgery Carries Some Uncertainty and Risk

Liposuction is normally safe, as long as patients are carefully selected, the operating facility is properly equipped and the physician is adequately trained. However, it’s important to keep in mind that even though a well-trained surgeon and a state-of-the art facility can improve your chance of having a good result, there are no guarantees. Though they are rare, complications can and do occur. Risks increase if a greater number of areas are treated at the same time, or if the operative sites are larger in size. Removal of a large amount of fat and fluid may require longer operating times than may be required for smaller operations.

The combination of these factors can create greater hazards for infection; delays in healing; the formation of fat clots or blood clots, which may migrate to the lungs and cause death; excessive fluid loss, which can lead to shock or fluid accumulation that must be drained; friction burns or other damage to the skin or nerves or perforation injury to the vital organs; and unfavorable drug reactions.

The scars from neck liposuction are small and strategically placed to be hidden from view. However, imperfections in the final appearance are not uncommon after liposuction. The skin surface may be irregular, asymmetric or even baggy, especially in the older patient. Numbness and pigmentation changes may occur. Sometimes, additional surgery may be recommended.

After Your Surgery

After surgery, you will likely experience some fluid drainage from the incisions. Occasionally, a small drainage tube may be inserted beneath the skin for a couple of days to prevent fluid build-up. To control swelling and to help your skin better fit its new contours, you may be fitted with a snug elastic garment to wear over the treated area for a few weeks. Your doctor may also prescribe antibiotics to prevent infection.

Don’t expect to look or feel great right after surgery. Even though the newer techniques are believed to reduce some post-operative discomforts, you may still experience some pain, burning, swelling, bleeding and temporary numbness. Pain can be controlled with medications prescribed by your surgeon, though you may still feel stiff and sore for a few days.

It is normal to feel a bit anxious or depressed in the days or weeks following surgery. However, this feeling will subside as you begin to look and feel better.

Getting Back to Normal

Healing is a gradual process. Your surgeon will probably tell you to start walking around as soon as possible to reduce swelling and to help prevent blood clots from forming in your legs. You will begin to feel better after about a week or two and you should be back at work within a few days following your surgery. The stitches are removed or dissolve on their own within the first week to 10 days.

Activity that is more strenuous should be avoided for about a month as your body continues to heal. Although most of the bruising and swelling usually disappears within three weeks, some swelling may remain for six months or more. Your surgeon will schedule follow-up visits to monitor your progress and to see if any additional procedures are needed.

Loose skin and jowls are a common problem people struggle with as they get older. The neck lift is designed to correct these issues and restore a youthful and well-toned appearance of the neck.

Neck lift surgery with Dr. Smith helps to reduce excess skin and tighten the underlying muscles. This helps to improve problems with skin laxity, neck folds, and jowls. Patients who undergo a neck lift will benefit from a well-defined and younger looking profile of the neck and lower face.

At Smith Plastic Surgery, we often perform the neck lift in combination with a facelift and other surgeries to achieve a full rejuvenation of the face. Dr. Smith believes that patients are able to achieve their best and most natural-looking results when they address multiple areas of the face.

We get great results with privacy and cost effectiveness. Call 952-922-0895 between 8am and 8pm to schedule a free, next-morning consultation with Dr. Smith, or you may leave your contact information on the form to your right. Enjoy the good life!

Click here to view our Before & After Gallery.

For additional information on neck lift surgery, please refer to the following guide provided by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

Neck Lift 1

A necklift can improve the loose, sagging skin around the neck that comes with age.

 

Neck Lift 2

Incisions usually begin above the hairline at the temples, follow the natural line in front of the ear, curve behind the earlobe into the crease behind the ear, and into or along the lower scalp.

 

Neck Lift 3

Neck tissue and muscle may be separated; fat may be trimmed or suctioned and underlying muscle may be tightened.

 

Neck Lift 4

After deep tissues are tightened, the excess skin is pulled up and back, trimmed and sutured into place.

 

Neck Lift 5

Most of the scars will be hidden within your hair and in the normal creases of your skin.

 

Neck Lift 6

After surgery, you’ll present a more youthful face to the world.

The Best Candidates for a Necklift

The best candidate for a necklift is a man or woman whose face and neck have begun to sag, but whose skin still has some elasticity and whose bone structure is strong and well-defined. Most patients are in their forties to sixties, but necklifts can be done successfully on people in their seventies or eighties as well.

All Surgery Carries Some Uncertainty and Risk

When a necklift is performed by a qualified plastic surgeon, complications are infrequent and usually minor. Still, individuals vary greatly in their anatomy, their physical reactions, and their healing abilities, and the outcome is never completely predictable.

Complications that can occur include hematoma (a collection of blood under the skin that must be removed by the surgeon), injury to the nerves that control facial muscles (usually temporary), infection, and reactions to the anesthesia. Poor healing of the skin is most likely to affect smokers.  You can reduce your risks by closely following your surgeon’s advice both before and after surgery.

Planning Your Surgery

Necklifts are very individualized procedures. In your initial consultation, the surgeon will evaluate your face, including the skin and underlying bone, and discuss your goals for the surgery.

Your surgeon should check for medical conditions that could cause problems during or after surgery, such as uncontrolled high blood pressure, blood clotting problems, or the tendency to form excessive scars. Be sure to tell your surgeon if you smoke or are taking any drugs or medications, especially aspirin or other drugs that affect clotting.

If you decide to have a necklift, your surgeon will explain the techniques and anesthesia he or she will use, the type of facility where the surgery will be performed, and the risks and costs involved. Don’t hesitate to ask your doctor any questions you may have, especially those regarding your expectations and concerns about the results.

Preparing for Your Surgery

You will get specific instructions on how to prepare for surgery, including guidelines on eating and drinking, smoking, and taking or avoiding certain vitamins and medications. Carefully following these instructions will help your surgery go more smoothly. If you smoke, it’s especially important to stop at least a week or two before and after surgery as smoking inhibits blood flow to the skin and can interfere with the healing of your incision areas.

If your hair is very short, you might want to let it grow out before surgery, so that it’s long enough to hide the scars while they heal.

Whether your necklift is being done on an outpatient or inpatient basis, you should arrange for someone to drive you home after your surgery and help you out for a day or two, if needed.

Where Your Surgery Will Be Performed

A necklift may be performed in a surgeon’s office-based facility, an outpatient surgery center, or a hospital. It’s usually done on an outpatient basis, but some surgeons may hospitalize patients for a day when using general anesthesia. Certain conditions such as diabetes or high blood pressure should be monitored after surgery and may also require a short inpatient stay.

Types of Anesthesia

Most necklifts are performed under local anesthesia, combined with a sedative to make you drowsy. You’ll be awake but relaxed, and your face will be insensitive to pain; however, you may feel some tugging or occasional discomfort.

Some surgeons prefer a general anesthesia. In that case, you’ll sleep through the operation.

The Surgery

A necklift usually takes several hours. It will take somewhat longer if you’re having more than one procedure done. For extensive procedures, some surgeons may schedule two separate sessions.

Every surgeon approaches the procedure in his or her own way. Some complete one side of the face at a time, and others move back and forth between the sides. The exact placement of incisions and the sequence of events depends on your facial structure and your surgeon’s technique.

Incisions usually begin near the earlobe, extending in a natural line behind the ear and continuing toward the hairline. A small incision may also be made under the chin. Your surgeon separates the skin from the fat and muscle below. Fat may be trimmed or suctioned from around the neck and chin to improve the contour. The surgeon then tightens the underlying muscle and membrane, pulls the skin back, and removes the excess. Stitches secure the layers of tissue and close the incisions; metal clips may be used on the scalp.

Following surgery, a small, thin tube may be temporarily placed under the skin behind your ear to drain any blood that might collect there. The surgeon may also wrap your head loosely in bandages to minimize bruising and swelling.

After Your Surgery

There isn’t usually significant discomfort after surgery. If there is, it can be lessened with the pain medication prescribed by your surgeon. (Severe or persistent pain or a sudden swelling of your face should be reported to your surgeon immediately.) Some numbness of the skin is quite normal; it will disappear in a few weeks or months.

Your doctor may tell you to keep your head elevated and as still as possible for a couple of days after surgery to lessen the swelling.

If you’ve had a drainage tube inserted, it will be removed one or two days after surgery. Bandages, when used, are usually removed after one to five days. Don’t be surprised at the pale, bruised, and puffy face you see. Just keep in mind that in a few weeks you’ll be looking normal.

Most of your stitches will be removed after about five days. Your scalp may take longer to heal, and the stitches or metal clips in your hairline could be left in a few days longer.

Getting Back to Normal

You should be up and about in a day or two, but plan on taking it easy for the first week after surgery. Be especially gentle with your face and hair since your skin will be both tender and numb and may not respond normally at first.

Your surgeon will give more specific guidelines for gradually resuming your normal activities. They’re likely to include these suggestions: avoid strenuous activity, including sex and heavy housework, for at least two weeks (walking and mild stretching are fine), and avoid alcohol, steam baths, and saunas for several months. Above all, get plenty of rest and allow your body to spend its energy on healing.

At the beginning, your face may look and feel rather strange. Your features may be distorted from the swelling, your facial movements may be slightly stiff, and you’ll probably be self-conscious about your scars. Some bruising may persist for two or three weeks, and you may tire easily. It’s not surprising that some patients are disappointed and depressed at first.

By the third week, you’ll look and feel much better. Most patients are back at work about ten days to two weeks after surgery. If you need it, special camouflage makeup can mask most bruising that remains.

Your New Look

The chances are excellent that you’ll be happy with your necklift, especially if you realize that the results may not be immediately apparent. Even after the swelling and bruises are gone, the hair around your temples may be thin. Your skin may feel dry and rough for several months. Men may find they have to shave in new places, such as behind the neck and ears where beard-growing skin has been repositioned.

You’ll have some scars from your necklift, but they’re usually hidden by your hair or in the natural creases of your face and ears. In any case, they’ll fade within time and should be scarcely visible.

Having a necklift doesn’t stop the clock. Your face will continue to age with time, and you may want to repeat the procedure one or more times–perhaps five or ten years down the line. But, in another sense, the effects of even one necklift are lasting. Years later, you’ll continue to look better than if you’d never had a necklift at all.

Have you noticed a lack of volume in a specific area of your face when you look in the mirror? Or maybe your lips aren’t quite as full and luscious as you would like them to be? Our facial fat injection procedure is a great non-surgical way for men and women to refine the contours of their face by using their body’s own fat cells for beautiful, yet subtle and natural results.

Also known as fat grafting or autologous fat transfer, our facial fat injection treatment takes excess fat cells from other areas of the body, processes them, and then uses them to restore volume to areas of deficiency in the face. You can literally lose unwanted fat from your hips, abdomen, or thighs and use those cells to enhance the appearance of your face—like killing two birds with one stone.

At Smith Plastic Surgery, we can use facial fat injections to restore volume to multiple areas of the face, such as the temples, eyes, cheeks, mouth, chin, and jawline. We also perform non-surgical lip enhancement procedures using either this fat injection process or the dermal filler, Juvéderm. In special cases, Dr. Smith can even perform this procedure to enhance the breasts or buttocks without using implants.

We get great results with privacy and cost effectiveness. Call 952-922-0895 between 8am and 8pm to schedule a free next-morning consultation with Dr. Smith, or you may leave your contact information on the form to your right. Enjoy the good life!

Click here to view our Before & After Gallery.

For additional information on facial fat injection, please refer to the following guide provided by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

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Injectable collagen or fat can help improve the skin’s texture by filling in the laugh lines and facial creases that often occur with aging.

 

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Years of squinting and other facial muscle movements can take their toll on the eye area, leaving crow’s feet and other noticeable lines

 

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After treatment, the skin around the eye area appears smoother and more taut.

 

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Lines and creases that form around the mouth are usually caused by gravity and a breakdown of tissues beneath the skin.

 

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The lower face appears firmer and smoother after treatment with injectables. Lines around the mouth are filled in and nearly imperceptible.

 

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With regular follow-up treatments, your refreshed look can be easily maintained.

If You’re Considering Injectables…

As we age, our faces begin to show the effects of gravity, sun exposure and years of facial muscle movement, such as smiling, chewing and squinting. The underlying tissues that keep our skin looking youthful and plumped up begin to break down, often leaving laugh lines, smile lines, crow’s feet or facial creases over the areas where this muscle movement occurs.

Soft-tissue fillers, most commonly injectable collagen, hyaluronic acid, or fat, can help fill in these lines and creases, temporarily restoring a smoother, more youthful-looking appearance. When injected beneath the skin, these fillers plump up creased and sunken areas of the face. They can also add fullness to the lips and cheeks. Injectable fillers may be used alone or in conjunction with a resurfacing procedure, such as a laser treatment, or a recontouring procedure, such as a facelift.

 

Knowing Your Options

Fillers are primarily used to improve the appearance of the skin’s texture. They can help correct deep facial wrinkles, creases and furrows, “sunken” cheeks, skin depressions and some types of scars. They can also be used to add a fuller, more sensuous look to the lips.

Injectables are usually not sufficient for severe surface wrinkles on the face, such as multiple vertical “lipstick lines” that sometimes form around the mouth. Instead, your plastic surgeon may suggest a resurfacing technique, such as chemical peel, dermabrasion or laser treatments. Rather than filling in facial lines, resurfacing methods strip away the outer layers of the skin to produce a smoother appearance.

Deep folds in the face or brow caused by overactive muscles or by loose skin may be more effectively treated with cosmetic surgery, such as a facelift or browlift. Injectables are sometimes used in conjunction with facial surgery procedures; however, injectables alone cannot change facial contours the way surgery can.

Keep in mind that a plastic surgeon is a specialist that can offer you the full gamut of the most advanced treatments ranging from cosmetic surgery, refinishing techniques, laser therapy, injectables and the use of other fillers. You and your surgeon may determine that a single procedure or a combination of procedures is the best choice for you.

 

A Word About Other Types of Fillers

This web page explains commonly used injectable fillers such as hyaluronic acid, collagen and fat. However, to a lesser extent, a number of other filler materials are also being used for facial-rejuvenation purposes. They include agents such as polymers, porcine collagen, or calcium hydroxylapatite. Each of these options has its own set of risks and benefits. If you’re considering any of these alternative filler treatments, tell your doctor.

What to Expect from Treatment

The most important fact to remember about injectable fillers is that the results are not permanent. Injected material is eventually metabolized by the body. You should not expect the same long-lasting results that may be gained from cosmetic surgery.

In some individuals, the results may last only a few weeks; in others, the results may be maintained indefinitely. Researchers believe that age, genetic background, skin quality and lifestyle, as well as the injected body site, may all play a role in the injected material’s “staying power.” However, the precise reason for the variation of results among patients has yet to be identified.

If you’ve had short-lived results from fat injections, you shouldn’t necessarily assume that collagen injections will work better for you. And, conversely, if you’ve had disappointing results from collagen, don’t assume that injected fat is the answer. Although it’s true that some individuals’ bodies are more receptive to one substance than the other, others may find that neither substance produces long-lasting results. Sometimes one substance may work better than the other for a specific problem.

Risks Related to Injectables

When injectables are administered by a qualified plastic surgeon, complications are infrequent and usually minor in nature. Still, individuals vary greatly in their anatomy, their physical reactions and their healing abilities. The outcome of treatment with injectables is never completely predictable.

Hyaluronic Acid: side effects are typically mild or moderate in nature and last for less than seven days. Adverse events include redness, pain, firmness, swelling, lumps/bumps, bruising, itching, and discoloration.

Collagen: Allergic reaction is the primary risk of collagen. To help determine if you are allergic to the substance, your surgeon will perform an allergy skin test about a month before the procedure. After the test is performed, the test site should be watched carefully for three or four weeks, or as long as your surgeon advises. Any sign of redness, itching, swelling or other occurrences at the test site should be reported to your surgeon.

Risks not necessarily related to allergies include infection, abscesses, open sores, skin peeling, scarring and lumpiness, which may persist over the treated area. Reports of these problems are very rare.

Fat: Allergic reaction is not a factor for fat because it’s harvested from a patient’s own body. However, there is still a small risk of infection and other infrequent complications.

Planning for Treatment

Facial rejuvenation is very individualized. That’s why it’s important to discuss your hopes and expectations with a board certified plastic surgeon who has experience with many different types of surgical and non-surgical facial procedures.

In your initial consultation, your plastic surgeon will evaluate your face– the skin, the muscles and the underlying bone–and discuss your goals for the surgery. Your doctor will help you select a treatment option based on your goals and concerns, your anatomy and your lifestyle.

Your surgeon will ask you about your medical history, drug allergies, and check for conditions that could cause problems, such as active skin infections or non-healed sores from injuries. Collagen injections are generally off limits for pregnant women, individuals who are allergic to beef or bovine products, patients who suffer from autoimmune diseases, and those who are allergic to lidocaine (the anesthetic agent contained in the syringe with the collagen material). For more specific information about the contraindications and risks of collagen use, ask your doctor for the manufacturer’s brochure for patients.

Insurance usually doesn’t cover cosmetic procedures. However, if your injectable treatment is being performed to treat a scar or indentation from an accident or injury, you may be reimbursed for a portion of the cost. Check with your insurance carrier to be sure.

Where Your Treatment Will Be Performed

Injectables are usually administered in a surgeon’s office-based facility. If, however, you are being hospitalized for a facelift, necklift, browlift, or any other procedure, your injections may be administered in the hospital as well.

Types of Anesthesia

Collagen: Because the anesthetic agent lidocaine is mixed in with collagen, additional anesthetic is usually not used. However, if you are especially sensitive to pain, your doctor may use a topical cream anesthetic or a freon spray to numb the injected area. Or, you may elect to have an injected local anesthetic or sedative drugs.

Fat: Both the donor and recipient sites are numbed with local anesthesia. Sedation can be used as well. If you elect to use sedation, be sure to arrange for a ride home after your treatment.

Collagen Injection

Collagen is a naturally occurring protein that supports tissue of the skin, joints, bones and ligaments. Injectable collagen can be derived from purified bovine collagen, porcine collagen or human sources. The purification process ensures the product is similar to human collagen. Injectable collagen is produced in varying concentrations to meet individual patient needs.

Collagen is used primarily to fill wrinkles, lines and scars on the face and sometimes the neck, back and chest. First, a skin test determines if you are allergic to the substance. If you are not allergic, the collagen is injected at several points along the edge of the targeted area. Local anesthesia can be used to control discomfort as the injections are administered. Because part of collagen is salt water that will be absorbed within a few days, your doctor may slightly overfill the area. You may be asked to hold a hand mirror during the procedure to help your doctor decide when you’ve had enough.

After treatment, you may notice some minor discomfort, stinging or throbbing in the injected area. Occasionally some bruising or swelling will occur, but it is usually minor. Redness that appears in the injected site usually disappears within 24 hours. However, in some individuals, particularly fair-skinned patients, this redness may persist for a week or more. Tiny scabs may also form over the needle-stick areas; these generally heal quickly.

No bandaging is needed and you are free to eat, drink, and wear makeup with sunblock protection shortly thereafter. There may be some temporary swelling and redness in the treated area which should dissipate within a few days. If these symptoms persist, contact your surgeon.

The duration of your results will vary. In general, the injected material is likely to disappear faster in areas that are more affected by muscle movement. Your doctor can help you determine how long you can go between treatments to best maintain your results.

Fat Injection

Fat-injection procedure is also known as autologous fat transplantation or micro-lipoinjection. Fat cells are extracted from the patient’s abdomen, thighs, buttocks or elsewhere and reinjected beneath the facial skin. Fat can fill in sunken cheeks or lines between the nose and mouth, correct skin depressions, minimize forehead wrinkles or enhance the lips.

After cleansing and treatment with local anesthesia, fat is withdrawn using a syringe with a large-bore needle or a liposuction cannula. The fat is then prepared and injected into the recipient site with a needle. Sometimes an adhesive bandage is applied over the injection site. Slight overfilling may be necessary to allow for fat absorption that occurs. When fat is used to augment the cheeks, this overcorrection may cause the face to appear abnormally full.

While some treatments require a brief recovery period, many patients resume normal activity right away. Expect some swelling, bruising or redness in both the donor and recipient sites. The severity of these symptoms depends upon the size and location of the treated area. Stay out of the sun until redness and bruising subsides–usually about 48 hours. In the meantime, you may use makeup with sunblock protection to help conceal your condition. In some cases, swelling and puffiness in the recipient site lasts several weeks, especially if a large area was filled.

While some patients report results lasting one year or more, the majority of patients find that at least half of the injected fullness disappears within 3-6 months. Therefore, repeated injections may be necessary. Your doctor will advise you on how to maintain your results with repeat treatments.

Your New Look

If you’re like most patients, you’ll be very satisfied with the results of your injectable treatments. You may be surprised at the pleasing results that can be gained from this procedure.

A harmonious, well-balanced appearance can mean a lot to a person’s sense of self-confidence. When a part of your face detracts from that balanced appearance, it can leave you feeling shy about your look or even make you wish you could hide or disguise those areas of your face. Whether you have a naturally smaller chin or cheeks, or have experienced a loss of volume as you have gotten older, Dr. Smith can help to create a more aesthetically proportional and natural look with facial implants.

At Smith Plastic Surgery, we can enhance areas of the face to create that more proportional look by using facial implants. Dr. Smith uses these customized implants to improve the size, projection, or general shape of the chin and cheeks. These facial implant procedures are known as chin augmentation and cheek augmentation.

To minimize any visible scarring, incisions will be made on the inside of your cheek to place your cheek implants. Chin implants can be placed through an incision made on the inside of your mouth beneath your lower lip. Dr. Smith also offers patients a fat transfer procedure which can be effective for more subtle enhancements. The best method for your goals will be discussed during your consultation.

We get great results with privacy and cost effectiveness. Call 952-922-0895 between 8am and 8pm to schedule a free, next-morning consultation with Dr. Smith, or you may leave your contact information on the form to your right. Enjoy the good life!

Click here to view our Before & After Gallery.

For additional information on facial implant surgery, please refer to the following guide provided by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

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Facial surgery is most often done to bring the face into balance by building up the chin, the cheeks, or the jaw.

 

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A short incision under the chin or inside the mouth allows the surgeon to place a chin implant directly on the bone.

 

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Cheek implants are usually inserted through an incision in the mouth and placed directly on (or even below) the cheekbone. These implants can vary in size and shape.

If You’re Considering Facial Surgery…

Facial implants, especially of the chin, are a time-tested way to improve facial contour and help correct shrinkage of facial fat as we age. Another option is to transfer fat by injection from another area of the body where there is excess fat. The improvement of appearance can be powerful, yet subtle.

Plastic surgeons use facial implants to improve and enhance facial contours. Frequently, these implants will help provide a more harmonious balance to your face and features so that you feel better about the way you look.

There are many implants available, manufactured from a variety of materials. They may help strengthen a jawline or bring the chin or cheekbones into balance with the rest of the face.

This brochure describes some of the facial implants currently available as well as the techniques for their use. It will familiarize you with these procedures but cannot provide all the details which may be relevant to your particular needs.

If you feel that one or more of the procedures described in this brochure may be of benefit, be sure to ask your plastic surgeon for more information.

What to Expect from a Facial Implant

Facial implants can enhance your appearance and bolster your self-esteem. If you are looking for improvement, not perfection, in your appearance and are realistic in your expectations, you may find that a facial implant is the right choice for you.

Plastic surgeons will frequently use such implants to bring better balance to the features of a younger patient. For instance, a teenage girl may want her nose reshaped or her chin brought forward so that these traits are better proportioned. The more mature patient may choose to have an implant placed in conjunction with another cosmetic procedure. For example, during a facelift, a patient may wish to have implants placed over the cheekbones to help restore a more youthful appearance. Implants may also be selected to fill out a face that appears “sunken” or tired.

All Surgery Carries Some Uncertainty and Risk

Facial implants can produce some remarkable changes. Problems rarely occur, but you need to be informed about such possibilities. This brochure will touch upon a few, but it is not intended to provide a detailed or complete inventory of potential risks.

A facial implant can shift slightly out of alignment and a second operation may be necessary to replace it in its proper position. Infection can occur with any operation. If infection were to occur around a facial implant and did not clear up after treatment with antibiotics, the implant might have to be temporarily removed and replaced at a later time. Other, less-frequent risks may be associated with certain implants. Be sure to ask your plastic surgeon for a description of the risks associated with the procedure in which you are interested.

Some of the implant materials are made of a solid silicone. Currently, there is no scientific evidence that this is a harmful substance. Your plastic surgeon will be happy to discuss any current scientific findings concerning the type of implant you’re considering.

Planning Your Surgery

When you discuss your surgery with your plastic surgeon, be certain that you clearly express your expectations. Your plastic surgeon will help you determine what is possible to achieve. It may be helpful to provide your surgeon with photos of people who have facial features similar to those you would like to have.

Be sure you understand the details of the proposed surgery, including the cost and what to expect during your recovery.

If the surgery will entail an incision inside your mouth, it is important that you inform your physician if you smoke or if you have any dental or gum problems. Your plastic surgeon will advise you on these matters.

In preparing for your surgery, be sure to find out if you’ll be able to drive home afterward or will require transportation. You should also ask if you’ll need to refrain from eating or drinking the night before your surgery, and if you should stop taking any medications, including aspirin and similar drugs. You may be instructed to take oral antibiotics both before and after the procedure to help guard against infection.

Your plastic surgeon will provide information about these important matters during your pre-operative consultation.

Where Your Surgery Will Be Performed

Your operation may take place in an office-based facility, a freestanding surgical center or a hospital outpatient facility. Sometimes, your plastic surgeon may require that you stay overnight. Your doctor will make such a recommendation based on your overall medical condition and whether another cosmetic procedure was performed simultaneously with the facial implant surgery.

Types of Anesthesia

In some cases, facial implant surgery may require only local anesthesia combined with a sedative. However, more frequently, a general anesthesia may be recommended.

Chin Surgery

Insertion of a chin implant may take anywhere from thirty minutes to an hour. During the procedure, the surgeon selects the proper size and shape implant to enhance your appearance and inserts it into a pocket over the front of the jawbone. The small incision to create the pocket and insert the implant is placed inside the mouth (along the lower lip) or in the skin just under the chin area.

Usually, the chin is taped after surgery to minimize swelling and discomfort. Sutures in the skin will be removed in five to seven days. If an intra-oral incision is used, the sutures will dissolve.

Recovering from Chin Surgery

You will experience some discomfort and swelling in the affected area for several days. It’s normal to experience some temporary difficulty with smiling and talking. Black and blue marks may be visible around the chin and neck. Your plastic surgeon will instruct you about dental hygiene, eating and any restrictions to your activities after surgery.

Cheek Surgery

Cheek implant surgery usually takes about thirty to forty-five minutes. When cheek implants are being placed in conjunction with another cosmetic procedure, such as a facelift, forehead lift or eyelid surgery, the implants may be inserted through the incisions made for those procedures. Otherwise, an incision will be made either inside your upper lip or your lower eyelid. A pocket is then formed and an implant is inserted.

After surgery, a dressing will be applied to minimize discomfort and swelling. The severity and duration of such side effects may vary, especially if another cosmetic procedure was performed at the same time.

Recovering from Cheek Surgery

Your plastic surgeon will provide you with instructions about post-operative care. There will be dietary restrictions as well as limitations to your activities. Again, these instructions will vary, especially if another procedure was performed along with your implant surgery. However, you should be aware that your ability to move your mouth and lips may be diminished temporarily. Stitches used to close the incisions inside your mouth usually dissolve within about 10 days.

Lower-Jaw Surgery

Insertion of a jaw implant usually takes about one to two hours. Internal incisions are made on either side of the lower lip to provide access for creating a pocket into which the lower-jaw implant can be inserted. Dissolving sutures are used to close the incisions.

Recovering from Jaw Surgery

Swelling is sometimes significant immediately following surgery, usually peaking 24 to 48 hours afterward. Although most of the significant swelling will subside over a period of several days, prolonged mild swelling may prevent your final facial contour from becoming apparent for several months.

During the healing phase, your activities and diet will be restricted. Your ability to smile, talk or move your mouth in any way may be limited for several days to weeks following surgery. Your plastic surgeon will instruct you about dental and oral hygiene during your recovery.

Getting Back to Normal

Remember, with any facial surgery, you may feel and look better in a short period of time. However, it may not be advisable to participate in certain activities for several weeks–especially any activity that may result in the face being jarred or bumped. It’s best to check with your plastic surgeon about such matters.

Your New Look

You may not be able to accurately evaluate your appearance for weeks, or perhaps even months. Give yourself plenty of time to get used to your new look.

You may be surprised to find that most people won’t recognize that you’ve had facial implant surgery — only that you look better.

Unfortunately, the smooth and taut skin we remember from our youth won’t last forever. Deep facial folds, skin laxity, and jowls are all common parts of getting older, but they can be hard to get used to or feel comfortable with when you look in the mirror. The facelift is one of the most popular facial plastic surgery procedures because of its ability to help rejuvenate up to a decade off a person’s appearance without having to sacrifice a beautifully natural look (*).

We believe good looking natural results come with a very experienced surgeon who treats all areas of the face. At Smith Plastic Surgery for a full classic facelift we nearly always lift the eyes, face, neck, and possibly the brows simultaneously to avoid a “polka dot” or uneven appearance. We may even use fat injections, which utilizes your body’s own natural fat cells to fill out the cheeks and around the eyes and mouth. This process helps to restore volume to essential areas of the face to avoid an obvious post-surgical look.

Our on-site surgical suite gives us access to completely optimized fine plastic surgery instruments and staff as well as endoscopic video equipment to operate around the eyes and forehead. This unique specialization in combination with Dr. Smith’s years of experience is necessary for an optimal result.

For younger patients we have a very nice mini-lift that is less expensive and treats only the neck and the the cheeks. The post-op recovery after this procedure is quite short.

The cost of your facelift at Smith Plastic Surgery will vary based on what needs to be done for your unique situation and to achieve your desired outcome.  Typically we do a mini face lift for quick recovery.  Our fee for this is $5800 for a mini facelift including liposuction of the neck.   Sedation anesthesia and the office facility are also included in this fee.

We get great results with privacy and cost effectiveness. Call 952-922-0895 between 8am and 8pm to schedule a free next-morning consultation with Dr. Smith, or you may leave your contact information on the form to your right. Enjoy the good life!

Click here to view our Before & After Gallery.

For additional information on facelift surgery, please refer to the following guide provided by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

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A facelift can improve the deep cheek folds, jowls and loose, sagging skin around the neck that come with age.

 

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Incisions usually begin above the hairline at the temples, follow the natural line in front of the ear, curve behind the earlobe into the crease behind the ear, and into or along the lower scalp.

 

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Facial, neck tissue and muscle may be separated; fat may be trimmed or suctioned and underlying muscle may be tightened.

 

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After deep tissues are tightened, the excess skin is pulled up and back, trimmed and sutured into place.

 

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Most of the scars will be hidden within your hair and in the normal creases of your skin.

 

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After surgery, you’ll present a fresher, more youthful face to the world.

If You’re Considering a Facelift…

As people age, the effects of gravity, exposure to the sun, and the stresses of daily life can be seen in their facial wrinkles. Deep creases form between the nose and mouth; the jawline grows slack and jowly; folds and fat deposits appear around the neck.

A facelift (technically known as rhytidectomy) can’t stop this aging process. What it can do is set back the clock, improving the most visible signs of aging by removing excess fat, tightening underlying muscles, and redraping the skin of your face and neck. A facelift can be done alone, or in conjunction with other procedures such as a forehead lift, eyelid surgery, or nose reshaping.

 

The Best Candidates for a Facelift

The best candidate for a facelift is a man or woman whose face and neck have begun to sag, but whose skin still has some elasticity and whose bone structure is strong and well-defined. Most patients are in their forties to sixties, but facelifts can be done successfully on people in their seventies or eighties as well.

A facelift can make you look younger and fresher, and it may enhance your self-confidence in the process. But it can’t give you a totally different look, nor can it restore the health and vitality of your youth. Before you decide to have surgery, think carefully about your expectations and discuss them with your surgeon.

All Surgery Carries Some Uncertainty and Risk

When a facelift is performed by a qualified plastic surgeon, complications are infrequent and usually minor. Still, individuals vary greatly in their anatomy, their physical reactions, and their healing abilities, and the outcome is never completely predictable.

Complications that can occur include hematoma (a collection of blood under the skin that must be removed by the surgeon), injury to the nerves that control facial muscles (usually temporary), infection, and reactions to the anesthesia. Poor healing of the skin is most likely to affect smokers.

You can reduce your risks by closely following your surgeon’s advice both before and after surgery.

Planning Your Surgery

Facelifts are very individualized procedures. In your initial consultation, the surgeon will evaluate your face, including the skin and underlying bone, and discuss your goals for the surgery.

Your surgeon should check for medical conditions that could cause problems during or after surgery, such as uncontrolled high blood pressure, blood clotting problems, or the tendency to form excessive scars. Be sure to tell your surgeon if you smoke or are taking any drugs or medications, especially aspirin or other drugs that affect clotting.

If you decide to have a facelift, your surgeon will explain the techniques and anesthesia he or she will use, the type of facility where the surgery will be performed, and the risks and costs involved. Don’t hesitate to ask your doctor any questions you may have, especially those regarding your expectations and concerns about the results.

Preparing for Your Surgery

Your surgeon will give you specific instructions on how to prepare for surgery, including guidelines on eating and drinking, smoking, and taking or avoiding certain vitamins and medications. Following these instructions carefully will help your surgery go more smoothly. If you smoke, it’s especially important to stop at least a week or two before and after surgery; smoking inhibits blood flow to the skin and can interfere with the healing of your incision areas.

If your hair is very short, you might want to let it grow out before surgery, so that it’s long enough to hide the scars while they heal.

Whether your facelift is being done on an outpatient or inpatient basis, you should arrange for someone to drive you home after your surgery and to help you out for a day or two, if needed.

Where Your Surgery Will Be Performed

A facelift may be performed in a surgeon’s office-based facility, an outpatient surgery center, or a hospital. It’s usually done on an outpatient basis, but some surgeons may hospitalize patients for a day when using general anesthesia. Certain conditions such as diabetes or high blood pressure should be monitored after surgery and may also require a short inpatient stay.

Types of Anesthesia

Most facelifts are performed under local anesthesia, combined with a sedative to make you drowsy. You’ll be awake but relaxed, and your face will be insensitive to pain. (However, you may feel some tugging or occasional discomfort.)

Some surgeons prefer a general anesthesia. In that case, you’ll sleep through the operation.

The Surgery

A facelift usually takes several hours–or somewhat longer if you’re having more than one procedure done. For extensive procedures, some surgeons may schedule two separate sessions.

Every surgeon approaches the procedure in his or her own way. Some complete one side of the face at a time, and others move back and forth between the sides. The exact placement of incisions and the sequence of events depends on your facial structure and your surgeon’s technique.

Incisions usually begin above the hairline at the temples, extend in a natural line in front of the ear (or just inside the cartilage at the front of the ear), and continue behind the earlobe to the lower scalp. If the neck needs work, a small incision may also be made under the chin.

In general, the surgeon separates the skin from the fat and muscle below. Fat may be trimmed or suctioned from around the neck and chin to improve the contour. The surgeon then tightens the underlying muscle and membrane, pulls the skin back, and removes the excess. Stitches secure the layers of tissue and close the incisions; metal clips may be used on the scalp.

Following surgery, a small, thin tube may be temporarily placed under the skin behind your ear to drain any blood that might collect there. The surgeon may also wrap your head loosely in bandages to minimize bruising and swelling.

After Your Surgery

There isn’t usually significant discomfort after surgery; if there is, it can be lessened with the pain medication prescribed by your surgeon. (Severe or persistent pain or a sudden swelling of your face should be reported to your surgeon immediately.) Some numbness of the skin is quite normal; it will disappear in a few weeks or months.

Your doctor may tell you to keep your head elevated and as still as possible for a couple of days after surgery, to keep the swelling down.

If you’ve had a drainage tube inserted, it will be removed one or two days after surgery. Bandages, when used, are usually removed after one to five days. Don’t be surprised at the pale, bruised, and puffy face you see. Just keep in mind that in a few weeks you’ll be looking normal.

Most of your stitches will be removed after about five days. Your scalp may take longer to heal, and the stitches or metal clips in your hairline could be left in a few days longer.

Getting Back to Normal

You should be up and about in a day or two, but plan on taking it easy for the first week after surgery. Be especially gentle with your face and hair since your skin will be both tender and numb and may not respond normally at first.

Your surgeon will give more specific guidelines for gradually resuming your normal activities. They’re likely to include these suggestions: avoid strenuous activity, including sex and heavy housework, for at least two weeks (walking and mild stretching are fine); avoid alcohol, steam baths, and saunas for several months. Above all, get plenty of rest and allow your body to spend its energy on healing.

At the beginning, your face may look and feel rather strange. Your features may be distorted from the swelling; your facial movements may be slightly stiff, and you’ll probably be self-conscious about your scars. Some bruising may persist for two or three weeks, and you may tire easily. It’s not surprising that some patients are disappointed and depressed at first.

By the third week, you’ll look and feel much better. Most patients are back at work about ten days to two weeks after surgery. If you need it, special camouflage makeup can mask most bruising that remains.

Your New Look

The chances are excellent that you’ll be happy with your facelift–especially if you realize that the results may not be immediately apparent. Even after the swelling and bruises are gone, the hair around your temples may be thin and your skin may feel dry and rough for several months. Men may find they have to shave in new places–behind the neck and ears–where areas of beard-growing skin have been repositioned.

You’ll have some scars from your facelift, but they’re usually hidden by your hair or in the natural creases of your face and ears. In any case, they’ll fade within time and should be scarcely visible.

Having a facelift doesn’t stop the clock. Your face will continue to age with time, and you may want to repeat the procedure one or more times-perhaps five or ten years down the line. But in another sense, the effects of even one facelift are lasting; years later, you’ll continue to look better than if you’d never had a facelift at all.

Your eyes can tell a lot about you—your age shouldn’t have to be one of those things. However, over the years the skin around your eyes can begin to show the past years of sun damage, repeated muscle movements, and gravity’s unavoidable pull. Eyelid surgery (blepharoplasty) has become an extremely popular and effective option for restoring a youthful and lively appearance of the face.

Whether you are experiencing drooping or sagging of the upper eyelids or puffiness beneath your eyes, Dr. Smith can work with you to develop a personalized plan that will help achieve the beautifully youthful eyes you want. Depending on your condition, Dr. Smith may recommend upper eyelid surgery, lower eyelid surgery, or a combination of the two.

At Smith Plastic Surgery, your eyelid surgery will be performed as an outpatient procedure at our on-site surgical suite. You will be able to return home under the care of a loved one that same night and be back at work within just a couple of weeks. Makeup can be used to help cover up any bruising or redness as your skin continues to heal over time.

In order to avoid visible scarring, Dr. Smith uses shorter incisions hidden within the natural folds and creases of your eyelids. Younger patients can often have lower lid surgery through a hidden incision just inside the eyelid without a visible scar. More commonly, we want to remove extra skin with a lower lid lift and place the incision just below the lower lid lashes. Removing the extra skin and trimming the redundant lower lid fat creates a relaxed, comfortable look to the face.

Our eyelid surgery costs around $2500 for the upper lids, $3200 for the lower lids, or $4300 for a full eyelid surgery procedure. The total price of your surgery will be reduced if you are combining eyelid surgery with other facial procedures such as an endoscopic brow lift or facelift.

We get great results with privacy and cost effectiveness. Call 952-922-0895 between 8am and 8pm to schedule a free next-morning consultation with Dr. Smith, or you may leave your contact information on the form to your right. Enjoy the good life!

Click here to view our Before & After Gallery.

For additional information on eyelid surgery, please refer to the following guide provided by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

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As people age, the eyelid skin stretches, muscles weaken, and fat accumulates around the eyes, causing “bags” above and below.

 

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The surgeon closes the incisions with fine sutures, which will leave nearly invisible scars.

 

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Before surgery, the surgeon marks the incision sites, following the natural lines and creases of the upper and lower eyelids.

 

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Underlying fat, along with excess skin and muscle, can be removed during the operation.

 

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In a transconjunctival blepharoplasty, a tiny incision is made inside the lower eyelid and fat is removed with fine forceps. No skin is removed, and the incision is closed with dissolving sutures.

 

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After surgery, the upper eyelids no longer droop and the skin under the eyes is smooth and firm.

If You’re Considering Eyelid Surgery…

Eyelid surgery (technically called blepharoplasty) is a procedure to remove fat–usually along with excess skin and muscle from the upper and lower eyelids. Eyelid surgery can correct drooping upper lids and puffy bags below your eyes–features that make you look older and more tired than you feel and that may even interfere with your vision. However, it won’t remove crow’s feet or other wrinkles, eliminate dark circles under your eyes, or lift sagging eyebrows. While it can add an upper eyelid crease to Asian eyes, it will not erase evidence of your ethnic or racial heritage. Blepharoplasty can be done alone or in conjunction with other facial surgery procedures such as a facelift or brow lift.

If you’re considering eyelid surgery, this web page will give you a basic understanding of the procedure-when it can help, how it’s performed, and what results you can expect. It can’t answer all of your questions, since a lot depends on the individual patient and the surgeon. Please ask your surgeon about anything you don’t understand.

The Best Candidates for Eyelid Surgery

Blepharoplasty can enhance your appearance and your self-confidence, but it won’t necessarily change your looks to match your ideal or cause other people to treat you differently. Before you decide to have surgery, think carefully about your expectations and discuss them with your surgeon.

The best candidates for eyelid surgery are men and women who are physically healthy, psychologically stable, and realistic in their expectations. Most are 35 or older, but if droopy, baggy eyelids run in your family, you may decide to have eyelid surgery at a younger age.

A few medical conditions make blepharoplasty more risky. They include thyroid problems such as hypothyroidism and Graves’ disease, dry eye or lack of sufficient tears, high blood pressure or other circulatory disorders, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes. A detached retina or glaucoma is also reason for caution; check with your ophthalmologist before you have surgery.

All Surgery Carries Some Uncertainty and Risk

When eyelid surgery is performed by a qualified plastic surgeon, complications are infrequent and usually minor. Nevertheless, there is always a possibility of complications, including infection or a reaction to the anesthesia. You can reduce your risks by closely following your surgeon’s instructions both before and after surgery.

The minor complications that occasionally follow blepharoplasty include double or blurred vision for a few days; temporary swelling at the corner of the eyelids; and a slight asymmetry in healing or scarring. Tiny whiteheads may appear after your stitches are taken out; your surgeon can remove them easily with a very fine needle.

Following surgery, some patients may have difficulty closing their eyes when they sleep; in rare cases, this condition may be permanent. Another very rare complication is ectropion, a pulling down of the lower lids. In this case, further surgery may be required.

Planning Your Surgery

The initial consultation with your surgeon is very important. The surgeon will need your complete medical history, so check your own records ahead of time and be ready to provide this information. Be sure to inform your surgeon if you have any allergies; if you’re taking any vitamins, medications (prescription or over-the-counter), or other drugs; and if you smoke.

In this consultation, your surgeon or a nurse will test your vision and assess your tear production. You should also provide any relevant information from your ophthalmologist or the record of your most recent eye exam. If you wear glasses or contact lenses, be sure to bring them along.

You and your surgeon should carefully discuss your goals and expectations for this surgery. You’ll need to discuss whether to do all four eyelids or just the upper or lower ones, whether skin as well as fat will be removed, and whether any additional procedures are appropriate.

Your surgeon will explain the techniques and anesthesia he or she will use, the type of facility where the surgery will be performed, and the risks and costs involved. (Note: Most insurance policies don’t cover eyelid surgery, unless you can prove that drooping upper lids interfere with your vision. Check with your insurer.)

Don’t hesitate to ask your doctor any questions you may have, especially those regarding your expectations and concerns about the results.

Preparing For Your Surgery

Your surgeon will give you specific instructions on how to prepare for surgery, including guidelines on eating and drinking, smoking, and taking or avoiding certain vitamins and medications. Following these instructions carefully will help your surgery go more smoothly.

While you’re making preparations, be sure to arrange for someone to drive you home after your surgery and to help you out for a few days if needed.

Where Your Surgery Will Be Performed

Eyelid surgery may be performed in a surgeon’s office-based facility, an outpatient surgery center, or a hospital. It’s usually done on an outpatient basis; rarely does it require an inpatient stay.

Types of Anesthesia

Eyelid surgery is usually performed under local anesthesia–which numbs the area around your eyes–along with oral or intravenous sedatives. You’ll be awake during the surgery, but relaxed and insensitive to pain. (However, you may feel some tugging or occasional discomfort.) Some surgeons prefer to use general anesthesia; in which case, you’ll sleep through the operation.

The Surgery

Blepharoplasty usually takes one to three hours, depending on the extent of the surgery. If you’re having all four eyelids done, the surgeon will probably work on the upper lids first, then the lower ones.

In a typical procedure, the surgeon makes incisions following the natural lines of your eyelids; in the creases of your upper lids, and just below the lashes in the lower lids. The incisions may extend into the crow’s feet or laugh lines at the outer corners of your eyes. Working through these incisions, the surgeon separates the skin from underlying fatty tissue and muscle, removes excess fat, and often trims sagging skin and muscle. The incisions are then closed with very fine sutures.

If you have a pocket of fat beneath your lower eyelids but don’t need to have any skin removed, your surgeon may perform a transconjunctival blepharoplasty. In this procedure, the incision is made inside your lower eyelid, leaving no visible scar. It is usually performed on younger patients with thicker, more elastic skin.

After Your Surgery

After surgery, the surgeon will probably lubricate your eyes with ointment and may apply a bandage. Your eyelids may feel tight and sore as the anesthesia wears off, but you can control any discomfort with the pain medication prescribed by your surgeon. If you feel any severe pain, call your surgeon immediately.

Your surgeon will instruct you to keep your head elevated for several days and to use cold compresses to reduce swelling and bruising. (Bruising varies from person to person: it reaches its peak during the first week, and generally lasts anywhere from two weeks to a month.) You’ll be shown how to clean your eyes, which may be gummy for a week or so. Many doctors recommend eye drops, since your eyelids may feel dry at first and your eyes may burn or itch. For the first few weeks you may also experience excessive tearing, sensitivity to light, and temporary changes in your eyesight, such as blurring or double vision.

Your surgeon will follow your progress very closely for the first week or two. The stitches will be removed two days to a week after surgery. Once they’re out, the swelling and discoloration around your eyes will gradually subside, and you’ll start to look and feel much better.

Getting Back to Normal

You should be able to read or watch television after two or three days. However, you won’t be able to wear contact lenses for about two weeks, and even then they may feel uncomfortable for a while.

Most people feel ready to go out in public (and back to work) in a week to ten days. By then, depending on your rate of healing and your doctor’s instructions, you’ll probably be able to wear makeup to hide the bruising that remains. You may be sensitive to sunlight, wind, and other irritants for several weeks, so you should wear sunglasses and a special sunblock made for eyelids when you go out.

Your surgeon will probably tell you to keep your activities to a minimum for three to five days, and to avoid more strenuous activities for about three weeks. It’s especially important to avoid activities that raise your blood pressure, including bending, lifting, and rigorous sports. You may also be told to avoid alcohol, since it causes fluid retention.

Your New Look

Healing is a gradual process, and your scars may remain slightly pink for six months or more after surgery. Eventually, though, they’ll fade to a thin, nearly invisible white line.

On the other hand, the positive results of your eyelid surgery-the more alert and youthful look-will last for years. For many people, these results are permanent.

The endoscope in plastic surgery has been a real advance for forehead and brow lifts. We are able to keep the scars very short and located behind the hairline. We use three or four half inch incisions to free up the forehead and eyebrows and lift them to an attractive and youthful position. The heavy tired look of sagging brows is replaced with a youthful relaxed and happy appearance. We put the brows where they were located during your twenties.

With this endoscopic approach, the hair is not shaved and the scars fall between the hair follicles. This technique avoids the scar at the anterior hairline and avoids the long scar which otherwise can extend from ear to ear. The surgery is very elegant and the results both powerful and natural appearing.

We get great results with privacy and cost effectiveness. Call 952-922-0895 between 8am and 8pm to schedule a free next morning consultation with Dr. Smith, or leave your contact information on the form to your right. Enjoy the good life!

Click here to view our Before & After Gallery.

For additional information on endoscopy, please refer to the following guide provided by the American Society of Plastic Surgeons.

If your doctor has recommended endoscopy . . .

Endoscopy is a surgical technique that involves the use of an endoscope, a special viewing instrument that allows a surgeon to see images of the body’s internal structures through very small incisions.

Endoscopic surgery has been used for decades in a number of different procedures, including gallbladder removal, tubal ligation, and knee surgery. However, in the world of plastic surgery, endoscopic instruments have recently been introduced. Plastic surgeons believe the technique holds great promise, but further study is needed to establish its effectiveness, especially over the long-term. As important research continues, endoscopy is being used on a limited basis for both cosmetic and reconstructive procedures.

This brochure will give you a basic understanding of endoscopy in plastic surgery–how it’s performed, what risks are involved, and the type of surgical training to look for in a surgeon. Please ask your doctor if there is anything you don’t understand about the specific procedure you’re planning to have.

The Endoscope

An endoscope consists of two basic parts: A tubular probe fitted with a tiny camera and bright light, which is inserted through a small incision; and a viewing screen, which magnifies the transmitted images of the body’s internal structures. During surgery, the surgeon watches the screen while moving the tube of the endoscope through the surgical area.

It’s important to understand that the endoscope functions as a viewing device only. To perform the surgery, a separate surgical instrument–such as a scalpel, scissors, or forceps–must be inserted through a different point of entry and manipulated within the tissue.

Advantages of Endoscopy

All surgery carries risks and every incision leaves a scar. However, with endoscopic surgery, your scars are likely to be hidden, much smaller and some of the after effects of surgery may be minimized.

In a typical endoscopic procedure, only a few small incisions, each less than one inch long, are needed to insert the endoscope probe and other instruments. For some procedures, such as breast augmentation, only two incisions may be necessary. For others, such as a forehead lift, three or more short incisions may be needed. The tiny eye of the endoscope’s camera allows a surgeon to view the surgical site almost clearly as if the skin were opened from a long incision.

Because the incisions are shorter with endoscopy, the risk of sensory loss from nerve damage is decreased. Also, bleeding, bruising and swelling may be significantly reduced. With the endoscopic approach, you may recover more quickly and return to work earlier than if you had undergone open surgery.

Endoscopic surgery may also allow you to avoid an overnight hospital stay. Many endoscopic procedures can be performed on an outpatient basis under local anesthesia with sedation. Be sure to discuss this possibility with your doctor.

In endoscopic surgery, a probe with a tiny camera transmits images inside the body to a video monitor.

Uses in Plastic Surgery

As research continues, it’s expected that many new uses for endoscopy will be developed. In the meantime, some plastic surgeons are using the technique on carefully selected patients. Some procedures that may be assisted by endoscopy are:

Cosmetic Surgery

Abdominoplasty (tummy tuck) — Endoscopy is sometimes used as an adjunct for selected patients who have lost abdominal muscle tone. Guided by the endoscope, the muscles that run vertically down the length of the abdomen may be tightened through several short incisions. Endoscopy is generally not used in patients who have a significant amount of loose abdominal skin.

Breast augmentation — Inserted through a small incision in the underarm or the navel, an endoscope can assist the surgeon in positioning breast implants within the chest wall. Endoscopy may also assist in the correction of capsular contracture (scar tissue that sometimes forms around an implant, causing it to feel firm), and in the evaluation of existing implants.

Facelift — Although the traditional facelift operation is still the best choice for most patients — especially those with a significant amount of excess skin — certain selected individuals may benefit from an endoscopically assisted procedure. When an endoscope is used, the customary incision along, or in the hairline is usually eliminated. Instead, small incisions may be strategically placed in areas where the most correction is needed. If the muscles and skin of the mid-face need to be smoothed and tightened, incisions may be hidden in the lower eyelid and in the upper gumline. To tighten the loose muscles of the neck, incisions may be concealed beneath the chin and behind the ears. The endoscope may also assist in the positioning of cheek and chin implants.

Forehead lift — Of all the cosmetic procedures that use endoscopy, forehead lift is the one which plastic surgeons more commonly perform. Instead of the usual ear-to-ear incision, three or more puncture-type incisions are made just at the hairline. The endoscope helps guide the surgeon, who removes the muscles that produce frown lines, and repositions the eyebrows at a higher level.

Reconstructive Surgery:

Flap surgery — Endoscopy can assist in repairing body parts that are damaged from injury or illness. Often, healthy tissue is borrowed from one part of the body to help repair another. Using an endoscope, the tissue or flaps can be removed from the donor site with only two or three small incisions.

Placement of tissue expanders — Used frequently in reconstructive surgery, tissue expanders are silicone balloons that are temporarily implanted to help stretch areas of healthy skin. The newly expanded skin is then used to cover body areas where skin has been lost due to injury (such as a burn) or disease. Using an endoscope, a surgeon can help ensure that a tissue expander is precisely positioned beneath the surface to bring the greatest benefit to the patient.

Sinus surgery — An endoscope can assist a surgeon in pinpointing and correcting sinus-drainage problems. It can also help locate nasal polyps (growths) or other problems within the sinus cavity, and assist in full rhino-septal surgery.

Carpal tunnel release — After the endoscope is inserted through a small incision in the wrist area, the surgeon locates the median nerve, which runs down the center of the wrist. A separate incision may be made in the palm to insert scissors or scalpel to cut the ligament putting pressure on the nerve.

Finding a Well-Trained Surgeon

Because endoscopy is a relatively new technique in plastic surgery, it’s extremely important that you select a board-certified plastic surgeon who has adequate training and experience.

Many endoscopic procedures do not require a hospital stay and are performed in a surgeon’s office or an out-patient surgery center. If you’re planning to have out-patient surgery, be sure that the surgeon you’ve selected has privileges to perform your particular endoscopic procedure at an accredited hospital. This assures you that your surgeon has been evaluated by the hospital’s quality-assurance review committee and is generally considered to have the needed training.

Be sure to find out if the surgeon’s hospital privileges cover both the endoscopic and the open version of the procedure you plan to have, since your doctor may have to switch to a traditional open procedure if a complication occurs during surgery.

Keep in mind that many plastic surgeons in practice today received endoscopy training as part of their plastic surgery or general surgery residency training. And, all board-certified plastic surgeons are continually being trained in new procedures.

Special Consideration and Risks

It’s important to keep in mind that the endoscopic approach has only recently been applied to plastic surgery procedures. There are some known risks, which vary in severity depending on the procedure being performed. These include infection, fluid accumulation beneath the skin (which must be drained), blood vessel damage, nerve damage or loss of feeling, internal perforation injury, and skin injury.

And, keep in mind that if a complication occurs at any time during the operation your surgeon may have to switch to an open procedure, which will result in a more extensive scar and a longer recovery period. However, to date, such complications are rare–estimated to occur in less that 5 percent of all endoscopy procedures.

Deciding if Endoscopic Surgery is Right for You

Although much is still unknown about endoscopic plastic surgery, you may want to focus on what is known as you make your decision. Considering the following:

For decades, endoscopy has been used successfully in orthopedic, urologic, and gynecologic procedures. Improved technology now permits endoscopy to be used by plastic surgeons.

If performed by an experienced, well-trained plastic surgeon, endoscopic procedures may provide the same results as open-method procedures, but with less scarring.

In some cases, endoscopic surgery may require less recovery time than is usually required for open procedures.

patients who tend to be the best candidates for cosmetic endoscopic procedures are those who don’t have large amounts of loose hanging skin. Patients with loose facial or abdominal skin may benefit from a combination of classic and endoscopic techniques, in face or forehead lift, or abdominoplasty.

Choose your Procedure

Botox® Cosmetic

When you look in the mirror, the face you see should match the way you feel on the inside. Sometimes the energetic and youthful person you are can get clouded by the crow’s feet and frown lines that sit on the surface of your skin.

Chin Surgery

Your chin plays a large role in framing your face. If you are unhappy with its size or appearance, it can make you feel as though your entire look is off-balance. Chin enhancement surgery can help to refine the size and/or projection of your chin and improve the overall harmony between facial features.

Ear Surgery

Large or protruding ears can be a problem for both children and adults. Ears that are larger or stick out further than normal can create an imbalance with other facial features.

Endoscopic Forehead/Brow Lift

Has your look started to appear drowsy or tired even when you’re wide awake? As you get older, it is normal for your skin to begin to droop or sag.

Eyelid Surgery

Your eyes can tell a lot about you—your age shouldn’t have to be one of those things. However, over the years the skin around your eyes can begin to show the past years of sun damage, repeated muscle movements, and gravity’s unavoidable pull.

Facelift

Unfortunately, the smooth and taut skin we remember from our youth won’t last forever. Deep facial folds, skin laxity, and jowls are all common parts of getting older, but they can be hard to get used to or feel comfortable with when you look in the mirror.

Facial Implants

A harmonious, well-balanced appearance can mean a lot to a person’s sense of self-confidence. When a part of your face detracts from that balanced appearance, it can leave you feeling shy about your look or even make you wish you could hide or disguise those areas of your face.

Facial Fat Injections

Have you noticed a lack of volume in a specific area of your face when you look in the mirror? Or maybe your lips aren’t quite as full and luscious as you would like them to be?

Neck Lift

Loose skin and jowls are a common problem people struggle with as they get older. The neck lift is designed to correct these issues and restore a youthful and well-toned appearance of the neck.

Neck Liposuction

Stubborn facial fat can be extremely difficult to get rid of. Even with plenty of diet and exercise, some men and women may still struggle with excess fat around the neck or chin.

Nose Surgery

The nose is one of the most common features of the face about which both men and women seem equally dissatisfied. Whether it’s because it is too big or too small, crooked, bulbous, droopy, or anything in between, when the nose feels out of place, it can negatively impact the way a person feels about his or her overall appearance.

Sutured Mini Facelift

That first wrinkle, fold, or sign of loosening skin can be truly hard to accept. You still feel as youthful and energetic as ever, but your face seems to be saying something else when you look in the mirror.

Face